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Webinar: Deodorant, Cleaning Products and the Virtue of Smelling Bad: Investigations into Emerging Sources of Air Pollution from Consumer Chemical Products

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Monday, 30 April 2018, 5:00

 

Monday, April 30, 2018. 5:30PM Eastern. Webinar: Deodorant, Cleaning Products and the Virtue of Smelling Bad: Investigations into Emerging Sources of Air Pollution from Consumer Chemical Products. Matthew M. Coggon, University of Colorado, Boulder. Sponsored by NCAR|UCAR. More information here.

Abstract: Over the past 50 years, urban air pollution due to vehicle emissions has steadily decreased at a rate of 7.5%/year. In the meantime, other sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have largely remained unchanged. Now that cars are cleaner, it has been estimated that other sources of reactive carbon, such as personal care products, cleaning products, and solvents from paints, may contribute up to half of the VOC burden in urban areas. The VOCs emitted from these sources are highest in indoor environments, but once exhausted to the outdoors, are likely to contribute to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol. Here, we will present work aimed at evaluating VOCs emitted from consumer products. First, we present work from Los Angeles showing that volatile chemical products are a major source of VOCs in urban air. Second, we will explore potential tracers that could be used to detect the presence of VOCs emitted from consumer products, including decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5-siloxane). Finally, we will present recent measurements aimed at assessing emissions of terpenes from fragranced consumer products. We will explore whether an anthropogenic signal can be detected in the urban environment, and distinguishable from biogenic sources.

 

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Contact  fennel(at)envsci.rutgers.edu