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Webinar: Methane Variation Over Terrestrial And Marine Arctic Areas (2010 – 2016): IASI Satellite Data

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Tuesday, 13 March 2018, 12:00

Tuesday, March 13, 2018. 12:00PM. Webinar: Methane Variation Over Terrestrial And Marine Arctic Areas (2010 – 2016): IASI Satellite Data. Leonid Yurganov, University of Maryland. Sponsored by NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research. More information here.


There is evidence that methane is being released into the atmosphere at high northern latitudes as the Arctic warms up. Methane concentration in the Arctic lower troposphere was estimated between 2010 and 2016 with the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), a thermal IR spectrometer orbiting the Earth on a satellite MetOp-A. The area studied encompasses the Barents/Kara seas and the West Siberian Lowland (WSL), one the most important methane sources in high northern latitudes. Methane anomalies were referenced to a specific deep sea region in the North Atlantic between 50° N and 83° N and assumed to be proportional to methane flux. Methane anomalies over the Arctic Ocean reach maxima in winter, coinciding with periods of strong and deep mixing of the Arctic Ocean water column. In summer, anomalies over the ocean decrease to zero every year. Annually averaged anomalies over sea and over land in summer-time have been increasing after 2014, and were twice as large in 2016 compared to 2010-2013. Methane anomalies estimated using the Japanese short-wave IR spectrometer GOSAT/TANSO over the WSL have also been increasing. Annual methane flux from the Barents and Kara Seas was estimated to be about 1/3 that from the West Siberian Lowland.

 

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