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2013-2014

The Evolving Understanding of Climate Risk & National Security: People, not Polar Bears

                        Read more: The Evolving Understanding of Climate Risk & National Security: People, not Polar Bears

Rear Admiral USN, (retired) David Titley, currently a Professor of Practice in Meteorology and Founding Director of the Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk at the Penn State Department of Meteorology spoke to a packed audience on the Cook Campus, New Brunswick on the risks of climate change to national security. Dr. Titley addressed key questions including: why is climate change a national security issue; how do we know it is happening, and what is the defense establishment doing to prepare for climate change? He noted that the Navy recognizes that the earth is warming and the ocean is storing most of the heat, and that the Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet. He also pointed out that Arctic warming is causing summer sea ice to rapidly melt and thin, thereby opening the region to increasing access and maritime activity. Climate considerations to national security also relate to infrastructure (for example, naval bases are located along coastlines which are at risk of sea level rise and extreme weather conditions) and energy implications (for military and domestic use). Food security issues are a concern as 2 billion people get their primary source of food from the ocean which is being impacted by ocean acidification from increased carbon in the atmosphere. Droughts and floods impact food prices which can exacerbate instability in already unstable regions threatening global security. Dr. Titley noted that to tackle the challenge of climate change, perhaps nations should focus on what they can agree on, such as that everyone should have the energy they need rather than blaming one country or another for the climate crisis. "I still believe this country can do really amazing things when we get focused, but the time is running out, meaning the more costly it will be as the challenge becomes harder and harder the longer we wait." The talk was jointly sponsored by Rutgers Climate Institute, Rutgers Energy Institute and Rutgers Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.

Video of Rear Admiral USN(retired) David Titley, Professor of Practice in Meteorology, Penn State

 

Read more: The Evolving Understanding of Climate Risk & National Security: People, not Polar BearsGuest lecturer Rear Admiral David Titley, U.S. Navy (Ret.) 3rd from Left with Program Hosts (left to right) Anthony Broccoli (Rutgers Climate Institute), Paul Falkowski (Rutgers Energy Institute), and Ying-Fan Reinfelder (Rutgers Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences).

 

   

Read more: The Evolving Understanding of Climate Risk & National Security: People, not Polar BearsRead more: The Evolving Understanding of Climate Risk & National Security: People, not Polar Bears

Rutgers Day - April 26, 2014

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Shored Up Film Screening and Panel Discussion: February 24, 2014

 Read more: Shored Up Film Screening and Panel Discussion: February 24, 2014
Panelists discussing the film screening of "Shored Up" from left to right include Tim Dillingham, (American Littoral Society), Jeffrey Gebert (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), Benjamin Horton (Rutgers University) and Norbert Psuty (Rutgers University). The moderator is Anthony Broccoli, (Rutgers University).


On February 24, 2014, Rutgers Climate Institute (RCI), in collaboration with the Cook Campus Dean and six other groups, co-hosted a film screening of Shored Up which drew over 170 students, faculty, and members of the public to the Cook Campus Center on the New Brunswick campus. Shored Up is a documentary that focuses on the impacts and risks of sea-level change on coastal communities from New Jersey to North Carolina. The film screening was followed by a panel discussion, featuring several experts who also appeared in the film. Panelists included Tim Dillingham, Executive Director of the American Littoral Society; Benjamin Horton, Professor, Rutgers University, Institute of Marine and Coastal Science; Jeffrey A. Gebert, Chief, Coastal Planning Section, US Army Corps of Engineers, Philadelphia District and Norbert Psuty, Professor Emeritus, Rutgers University Institute of Marine and Coastal Science. RCI Co-director, Anthony Broccoli, Professor, Rutgers University, Environmental Science, moderated the panel. Read more about the film screening and panel discussion at the Daily Targum.

 

         Read more: Shored Up Film Screening and Panel Discussion: February 24, 2014
Event Sponsors: Rutgers Climate Institute, Cook Campus Dean, Undergraduate Academic Affairs, Environmental Science Graduate Student Association, Rutgers Meteorology Club, Rutgers Environmental Science and Engineering Club, Rutgers Undergraduate Geography Society, and the Rutgers Oceanography Club. 
 


Video of Shored Up panel discussion

Freeze Frame: Art and the Cryosphere, a lecture by artist Diane Burko – November 6 2013



Read more: Freeze Frame: Art and the Cryosphere, a lecture by artist Diane Burko – November 6 2013

Photo (left to right): Diane Burko (artist), Professor Asa Rennermalm (Geography), Professor Hal Salzman (Bloustein).

Freeze Frame: Art and the Cryosphere, offered in conjunction with the Zimmerli exhibition Diane Burko: Glacial Perspectives, featured a lecture by Diane Burko, who discussed her recent trips to the Arctic and Antarctica and her experience creating paintings that confront climate change. The lecture is part of the interdisciplinary seminar series, Polar Perspectives on Art and Science. It is presented in relation with the Spring 2014 Byrne Seminar "Arctic Lens: A Journey to The Great North through Film," taught by professors Asa Rennermalm and Hal Salzman (pictured).

The museum's partners include the Rutgers Climate Institute, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Department of Geography, the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, the Institute for Women and Art, and the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs.

Read more about Diane Burko's work here

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